Accueil > Political Philosophy of Nature

IFCO 2120 - Political Philosophy of Nature

Type d'enseignement : Lecture alone

Semester : Spring 2016-2017

Number of hours : 24

Language of tuition : English

Voir les plans de cours et bibliographies

Pre-requisite

Requires some interest in political ecology broadly conceived and/or in political philosophy and/or a good grasp of the natural and social sciences associated with ecology.

Course Description

The class will present the basis of political philosophy as it is renewed by the impact of the present ecological situation. It will use the mAke it work experience of last year as its benchmark and will use the events of the COP 21 as its empirical field work. Special interest will be paid to the new geopolitical map drawn by the COP and its aftermath. Students will work in team of two to debrief he experience of the COP in the light of the concepts developed in the class.

Teachers

  • LATOUR, Bruno (Professeur des Universités)
  • LE DONNÉ, Margaux (Teaching Assistant)

Pedagogical format

Lecture alone

Course validation

Work in team and blogs written during the whole semester according to an original method specific to this class.

Workload

Be prepared to read the equivalent of two full length books in English and work regularly on primary material.

Required reading

  • Lovelock, James. The Vanishing Face of Gaia. New York: Basic Books, 2009
  • Latour, Bruno. Politics of Nature: How to Bring the Sciences into Democracy (translated by Catherine Porter). Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 2004.
  • Edwards, Paul N. A Vast Machine. Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press, 2010. Print.
  • Descola, Philippe 2013 Beyond Nature and Culture (translated by Janet Lloyd with a foreword by Marshall Sahlins), Chicago: Chicago University Press.
  • Diamond, J. 1997 Guns, Germs and Steel. A Short History of Everybody for the Last 13.000 Years, London: Vintage Book.

Plans de cours et bibliographies

  • Session n°1: Philosophy of Nature : a brief history
  • Session n°2: The question of agency and the new epistemological status given to the sciences
  • Session n°3: What does the irruption of ecological crisis change into political theory
  • Session n°4: The two new figures of Gaia and the anthropocene
  • Session n°5: Issue based political ecology (final selection of issues by students) 
  • Sessions n°6: War and peace and the geopolitics of nature
  • Session n°7: The political theology of nature
  • Session n°8: Anthropology of Nature : a brief survey
  • Session n°9: The new definition of territories and its consequences on the mapping of the Earth
  • Session n°10: How to model the negotiation regarding fighting territories done
  • Session n°11: Overlapping territories now represented
  • Session n°12: The triangulation of politics

Bibliography

  • Bonneuil, Christophe, and Jean-Baptiste Fressoz. The Shock of the Anthropocene. The Earth, History and Us (Translated by David Fernbach).  New York: Verso, 2016..
  • Philippe Descola. Beyond Nature and Culture (translated by Janet Lloyd with a foreword by Marshall Sahlins). Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2013.
  • Edwards, Paul N. A Vast Machine. Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press, 2010. Print.
  • François, Pape. Laudato Si!  Vatican: Saint Siège, 2015.
  • Hamilton, Clive. Earthmasters. The Dawn of the Age of Climate Engineering.  New Haven: Yale University Press, 2013.
  • Lovelock, James. The Vanishing Face of Gaia. New York: Basic Books, 2009.
  • Latour, Bruno. Politics of Nature: How to Bring the Sciences into Democracy (translated by Catherine Porter). Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 2004.
  • Latour, Bruno, Facing Gaia. Eight Lectures on the New Climatic Regime (Translated by Cathy Porter).  London: Polity Press, 2017.
  • Mitchell, Timothy. Carbon Democracy. Political Power in the Age of Oil. New York: Verso, 2011.
  • Serres, Michel. The Natural Contract (translated by E. MacArthur and W. Paulson). Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press, 1995. Print.
  • Jan Zalasiewicz. The Earth After Us. What Legacy will Humans leave in the rocks? Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008.