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IFCO 2405 - World on the move. Migrants, states and human rights in the global economy

Type d'enseignement : Lecture alone

Semester : Autumn 2017-2018

Number of hours : 24

Language of tuition : English

Voir les plans de cours et bibliographies

Pre-requisite

aucun

Course Description

Migration has been at the heart of heated national debates. Media coverage often covers the topic in Manichean terms: migrants are either victims or threats. Migration is considered as a major issue for global governance and a key feature of contemporary cities. This course provides you with the tools to answer the key questions raised by international mobility and useful concepts based on cutting-edge social science research and reliable data sources. What does migration tell us about the relationship between states, global markets, and diverse societies? The course examines how and why states regulate the movement of people, investigates the transnational dynamics set by international migrants and how they change home and host societies and addresses the issue of forced migration and refugee camps.

Teachers

  • GUIRAUDON, Virginie F. (CNRS Research Professor, CEE - Sciences Po)
  • MENNESSON, Ségolène L. (Etudiante doctorante)

Course validation

There will be a mid-term exam (40% of the grade) and a final paper due on the last day of class.

Workload

There will be one or two required reading each week (circa 40 pages).

Required reading

  • Torpey, John (1998) "Coming and Going: On the State Monopolization of the Legitimate “Means of Movement”. Sociological Theory 16: 239–259.
  • Massey, Doug et al. (1993) "Theories of International Migration: A Review and Appraisal," Population and Development Studies 19(3): 431-466.
  • Levitt, Peggy and Deepak Lamba-Nieves (2011) "Social Remittances Revisited," Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 37 (1): 1-22.
  • Michel Agier (2002) “Between War and City: Towards an Urban Anthropology of Refugee Camps," Ethnography 3: 317-341.

Plans de cours et bibliographies

  • Séances n°1. Introduction. Key concepts and questions.
  • Séance n° 2: Why do people move? Talking across disciplines.
  • Séance n°3: Migration and the new global economy. Capital flows and human capital.
  • Séances n°4: The role of migration in state-building. Population, security, territory and the birth of modern bureaucracies.
  • Séance n°5: Transnational dynamics: how do international migrants change home and host societies?
  • Séances n°6: Mid-term exam.
  • Séance n°7: The "global city." The branding of diversity and the reality of socio-ethnic segregation.
  • Séance n°8. Women on the move. Gendered migration and care.
  • Séance n°9. Guest speaker. The global governance of migration: a view from the inside.
  • Séance n°10. The EU experiment. The rebirth of free movement in a world of states.
  • Séance n°11: A world of camps. "Welcome to Refugeestan."
  • Séance n°12: The politics of the current "refugee crisis" and policy responses.

References

  • Castles, Stephen, Hein de Haas and Mark Miller (2013) The Age of Migration. International Population Movements in the Modern World. Fifth edition. Basingstoke: Palgrave McMillan.
  • Torpey, John (1998) "Coming and Going: On the State Monopolization of the Legitimate “Means of Movement”. Sociological Theory 16: 239–259.
  • Massey, Doug et al. (1993) "Theories of International Migration: A Review and Appraisal," Population and Development Studies 19(3): 431-466.
  • Levitt, Peggy and Deepak Lamba-Nieves (2011) "Social Remittances Revisited," Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 37 (1): 1-22.
  • Agier, Michel (2002) “Between War and City: Towards an Urban Anthropology of Refugee Camps," Ethnography 3: 317-341.
  • Sassen, Saskia 52014) Expulsions: Brutality and Complexity in the Global Economy. Cmabridge, MA: Belknap/Harvard university Press.