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KINT 7550 - Comparative Education Policy

Type d'enseignement : Seminar

Semester : Spring 2017-2018

Number of hours : 24

Language of tuition : English

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Pre-requisite

aucun

Course Description

Across OECD countries, education policy reforms have become a priority, with over 12% of public expenditures invested in education annually. Our fast changing knowledge economies and technologies, social cohesion, growth and development rely on the capacity of education systems to prepare students for their future. How are OECD education systems facing this challenge? What types of education policy reforms can be implemented? How to develop analysis on the types of policy reforms required for our quick evolving environments? This course aims to introduce students to comparative education policy and to develop their skills to deliver education policy analysis and communicate effectively for international, national institutions or NGOs related to education. It is divided in 3 parts: 1. Education policy in a comparative perspective. Students learn and review theory of education policy and policy making, educational change, actors and contextual factors that influence education policy and its success. It reviews different policy areas as well as global trends and challenges of education policy. 2. Knowledge of the main comparative analytical tools available. Students learn about and research education policy issues building on quantitative date such as OECD's PISA, TALIS or Education at a Glance or qualitative sources and how to best deliver the information to policy makers. 3. Responding to concrete education policy challenges: Students examine challenges countries face as they seek to reform their education systems to respond to changing skills needs. They review the types of policy responses countries are developing or deliver analysis on the types of education policies and reforms which can be delivered in the future. To this end a number of case-studies are analysed and discussed during the course.

Teachers

PONT, Béatriz (Analyste Senior)

Pedagogical format

Objectives: At the end of the course, students will be able to do education policy analysis for international, national institutions or NGOs related to education, having acquired: 1) Comparative education policy knowledge  Different policy issues and policy approaches available towards school improvement - issues facing education policy makers across OECD countries;  Recognition of the influence of the policy process, actors and institutions in the formulation of educational policy (theories of education policy processes; institutions; actors);  Recognition of different international institutions that play a role in education policy. 2) Education policy analysis skills  Understand and use tools available for analysis (qualitative and quantitative)  Develop effective education policy communication skills (drafting policy texts, social media, press releases, reports, presentations). Methodology: The course combines different study approaches to ensure knowledge of the topic and practical skills in education policy analysis. There are core and complementary readings, presentations in class, discussions and policy analysis review. Normally each class session will have background readings, a main lecture by the professor, followed by a study discussion or role playing based on the questions presented in the previous course. Selected guest speakers from relevant institutions may join the class to present on concrete topics.

Course validation

Student learning achievement will be measured by combining grades from class participation (10%), a policy paper (50%) and a group case study (40%). Here is how it will be measured more concretely: 1. Class participation: Students will engage in discussing questions and education policy issues applied to a real country situation during class. Students can voluntarily draft a blog with a summary of topics covered in class in a blog format (maximum of 800 words) to include in a class blog. As there are 12 sessions, students can either group (2 students maximum) to draft the blog or provide an individual blog on a concrete course reading. Participation will be measured by active contributions to class discussions that show preparation and understanding of key issues for each session and by contributions to the course blog. Voluntary class blog : http://compedupolicy.blogspot.fr (new address to be confirmed) This is a voluntary assignment, but suggested for you to develop blog writing skills on education policy. There is increasing information and knowledge on education delivered through social media and developing these skills is useful for your professional future. In addition, as you will sign it and it will be online, it can be a reference for internships or employers. You can draft a blog summarising and highlighting main points of one session or develop your own blog on a related reading or subject presented or discussed in class. Sign up here. You can draft the blog choosing different perspectives: • Student: Write about the course and main conclusions, what you learned and what your opinion is. • Policy analyst perspective: What does the evidence say and what are the main findings relevant for specific education systems and contexts? • Journalist: What is new, what does the evidence say, and why is it relevant? Use a simple writing style that can attract the reader: why is this reading interesting and valuable to him/her? What can s/he learn? Add a link to everyday life. Blogs should be no more than 600 words maximum! 1. It should have a main message, the development of 2/3 key points and a conclusion. 2. Use data and evidence to support the text. 3. Use enticing headings in bold throughout the text. 4. The overall title is important: make it attractive. 5. Sign the blog. 6. If you want you can add a figure, image or photograph. 7. You can also provide links to further readings. Remember to keep it simple, focused on 2 or 3 messages and relevant and interesting to external readers. 2. Team case studies on school improvement in a selected country Teams of no more than 5 students will develop analysis and advice to a concrete government facing either low and decreasing education performance or future challenges. The case study will account for 40% of the course grade. Country selection: Select from among the countries chosen here. Teams need to be multinational, to deliver international advice on the country chosen. Students need to sign up for the country case study by lesson n. 3 and presentations will be done between lesson 8-10. For the analysis: The team will need to review and understand the main challenges facing the country in terms of school improvement and suggest broad recommendations for action. The team should: • review relevant contextual and educational data, including PISA, TIMSS or PIRLS, TALIS, PIAAC, Education at a Glance, Eurydice, and other comparative data. • Review current policies and governance structure to understand policy capacity • Propose a course of action to the government for the next 4 years as part of a long term perspective. Course of action should take into consideration government and political situation for it to be feasible. As deliverables, the team will: • prepare a 1-2 page document with their analysis and recommendations; • make a 15-20 min. presentation in class followed by 20 minute discussion. Grading will be measured by the quality of the analysis and of the recommendations delivered to the country as well as the presentation. Presentation dates: Select case study by course 3. between course 8 and course 10. Present case studies and document in class and via mail to beatriz.pont@sciencespo.fr. 2. Policy Paper: specific policy choices that can contribute to school improvement Each student will turn in a policy paper analysing an education policy issue from a comparative perspective and developing recommendations, which will account for 50% of the course grade. The objective of this assignment is to use different data and qualitative evidence to develop analysis of education policy choices and provide specific recommendations built on the analysis that can contribute to improve school outcomes at an international, national or regional level. Focus: The topic should be related to an issue covered in class, preferably around the policy levers presented in the Education Policy Outlook, but can also focus on other topics which you find important and for which there is evidence. It should have a comparative dimension. It can either explore a particular policy issue for a country building on comparative analysis or a policy issue for the international community with more general recommendations. If the evidence or conclusions show that this is not so strongly related to outcomes, your conclusions should point this out. Link to topic selection here. Structure: The report should present the issue, analyse research evidence and country practices and present a conclusion with policy options for consideration. The report should have a clear policy paper structure: • 1 page executive summary with the main points, including conclusions or recommendations; • Introduction with an overview of the topic: Why is this topic important/relevant for policy makers? • Context and current situation: Describe the context and the situation concluding on why this is a particular challenge: What does the comparative data reflect? Describe the data and the current practices across countries. Why is this a particular challenge or important issue for policy makers? • Evidence: What does the comparative evidence say? Use research literature and economics of education journal articles that provide evidence. What are countries which have tackled this issue done? Are there relevant country practices? Is there evidence or evaluation of what works? • Conclusions: summarise the main conclusions of what works and does not work and provide suggestions or recommendations for action. How can this contribute to school improvement? Who can benefit from this knowledge? Around 5.000 – 6.000 words, including summary, tables, figures and bibliography. Size 11 font, with regular margins and simple line spacing with 6 pts between paragraphs. Grading will be measured by the quality of the analysis, the use of evidence, the relevance and internal coherence of the policy paper. Due date: Choose topic by course n. 4 and present final proposal by course 7. Paper on last day of course. No extensions allowed. Submit papers via email to beatriz.pont.scpo@analyse.urkund.com.

Workload

Class readings, group case studies and individual paper. Voluntary blog. Students will engage in discussing questions and education policy issues applied to a real country situation during class. Students can voluntarily draft a blog with a summary of topics covered in class in a blog format (maximum of 800 words) to include in a class blog. As there are 12 sessions, students can either group (2 students maximum) to draft the blog or provide an individual blog on a concrete course reading. Participation will be measured by active contributions to class discussions that show preparation and understanding of key issues for each session and by contributions to the course blog. Voluntary class blog http://compedupolicy.blogspot.fr This is a voluntary assignment, but suggested for you to develop blog writing skills on education policy. There is increasing information and knowledge on education delivered through social media and developing these skills is useful for your professional future. In addition, as you will sign it and it will be online, it can be a reference for internships or employers. You can draft a blog summarizing and highlighting main points of one session or develop your own blog on a related reading or subject presented or discussed in class. Sign up here. You can draft the blog choosing different perspectives: • Student: Write about the course and main conclusions, what you learned and what your opinion is • Policy analyst perspective: What does the evidence say and what are the main findings relevant for specific education systems and contexts? • Journalist: What is new, what does the evidence say, and why is it relevant? Use a simple writing style that can attract the reader: why is this reading interesting and valuable to him/her? What can s/he learn? Add a link to everyday life. Blogs should be no more than 600 words maximum! • It should have a main message, the development of 2/3 key points and a conclusion. • Use data and evidence to support the text. • Use enticing headings in bold throughout the text. • The overall title is important: make it attractive. • Sign the blog. • If you want you can add a figure, image or photograph. • You can also provide links to further readings. Remember to keep it simple, focused on 2 or 3 messages and relevant and interesting to external readers. Team case studies on school improvement in a selected country Teams of no more than 5 students will develop analysis and advice to a concrete government facing either low and decreasing education performance or future challenges. The case study will account for 40% of the course grade. Country selection: Select from among the countries chosen here. Teams need to be multinational, to deliver international advice on the country chosen. For the analysis: The team will need to review and understand the main challenges facing the country in terms of school improvement and suggest broad recommendations for action. The team should:review relevant contextual and educational data, including PISA, TIMSS or PIRLS, TALIS, PIAAC, Education at a Glance, Eurydice, and other comparative data. Review current policies and governance structure to understand policy capacity.Propose a course of action to the government for the next 4 years as part of a long term perspective. Course of action should take into consideration government and political situation for it to be feasible. As deliverables, the team will: prepare a 5 page document (maximum) with their analysis and recommendations; make a 15-20 min. presentation in class followed by a discussion.Grading will be measured by the quality of the analysis and of the recommendations delivered to the country as well as the presentation. Due dates between March 24th and April 14th 2016 Present case studies and document in class and via mail to beatriz.pont@sciencespo.fr. Policy Paper Policy choices that can contribute to school improvementEach student turn in a policy paper analysing an education policy issue and developing recommendations, which will account for 50% of the course grade.The objective of this assignment is to use different data and qualitative evidence to develop analysis of education policy choices that can contribute to improve school outcomes at an international, national or regional level. Focus The topic should be related to an issue covered in class, preferably around the policy levers presented in the Education Policy Outlook (see table below), but can also focus on others which you find important and for which there is evidence. It should have a comparative dimension. It can explore a particular policy issue for a country building on comparative analysis or a broader issue for the international community with more general recommendations. If the evidence or conclusions show that this is not so strongly related to outcomes, your conclusions should point this out. Link to topic selection here. Structure: The report should present and analyse evidence and country practices and present a conclusion with options for consideration. The report should have a clear policy paper structure: 1 page executive summary with the main points, including conclusions or recommendations; Introduction with an overview of the topic: Why is this topic important/relevant for policy makers? Context and current situation: Describe the context and the situation concluding on why this is a particular challenge: What does the comparative data reflect? Describe the data and the current practices across countries. Why is this a particular challenge or important issue for policy makers? Evidence: What does the comparative evidence say? Use research literature and economics of education journal articles that provide evidence. What are countries which have tackled this issue done? Are there relevant country practices? Is there evidence or evaluation of what works? Conclusions: summarise the main conclusions of what works and does not work and provide suggestions or recommendations for action. How can this contribute to school improvement? Who can benefit from this knowledge? Around 5.000 – 6.000 words, including summary, tables, figures and bibliography. Size 11 font, with regular margins and simple line spacing with 6 pts between paragraphs. Grading will be measured by the quality of the analysis, the use of evidence, the relevance and internal coherence of the policy paper. Due date: April 21, 2016 no extensions allowed Submit papers via email to beatriz.pont.scpo@analyse.urkund.com.

Required reading

  • 1. Hargreaves, A. and Shirley, D. (2012), The Global Fourth Way: The Quest for Educational Excellence, Corwin, Sage Publications.
  • 2. Heck, R., (2004) Studying Educational and Social Policy: Theoretical Concepts and Research Methods, Laurence Erlbaum Associates. Also available as an E-book
  • 3. Malone H. (Ed.), (2013), Leading Educational Change: Global Issues, Challenges and Lessons on Whole-System Reform. New York: Teachers College Press.
  • 4. OECD (2015), Education Policy Outlook 2015: Making Reforms Happen. OECD Publishing. www.oecd.org/edu/policyoutlook.htm.
  • 5. Van Zanten, A., (2014), Les politiques d'éducation. Que sais-je ? 2396. 3ème éd.. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France. http://spire.sciencespo.fr/hdl:/2441/4bg1vcs0j891o9p4hi679ofjrk.

Additional required reading

6. Reimers, F. Chung, C.K (Eds.) (2016). Teaching and Learning for the Twenty-First Century, 304. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press. http://hepg.org/hep- home/books/teaching-and-learning-for-the-twenty-first-century

Plans de cours et bibliographies