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OADH 4000 - Advocacy: Philosophy and Practice

Type d'enseignement : Seminar

Semester : Spring 2017-2018

Number of hours : 24

Language of tuition : English

Pre-requisite

aucun

Course Description

This course has been labelled as a “PSIA pedagogically innovative course”(see below pedagogical format for further information). Objectives of the course : Develop a keen understanding of the history, philosophy, tools, and current methods of advocacy with reference to key texts and case studies. Identify your interests and refine your skills as an advocate, amplifying your natural talents and developing new ones. The class is intended to strike a balance between the presentation of key ideas, the consideration of personal and professional advocacy experiences, and the exploration of emerging trends and problems. We will take part in a unique collaboration with UNICEF, participating in research projects to strengthen their ability to advocate for children and youth in countries throughout the world. Students will form working groups of three or four, in which they will plan and execute an advocacy research project, self-directed or with guidance from UNICEF country offices; in addition, each student will write a 4-6 page personal reflection on an advocacy problem of special interest, drawing upon the texts of the class.

Teachers

PAULSON, Lex (Vice-President stratégie, La Nouvelle Ecoles d'Athènes)

Pedagogical format

This course has been labelled as a “PSIA pedagogically innovative course”: Course taught in partnership with UNICEF ; Concrete application of theoretical knowledge in advocacy to different projects lead by UNICEF ; Development of strong team work and peers management skills in an international context. Classes will be conducted as a combination of group discussion of texts and voluntary participation in advocacy exercises (for example, how to craft and present a personal story in 5 minutes or less).

Course validation

Students will form working groups of three or four, in which they will plan and execute an advocacy research project, self-directed or with guidance from UNICEF country offices; in addition, each student will write a 4-6 page personal reflection on an advocacy problem of special interest, drawing upon the texts of the class. 4-6 page personal essay (50%); small-group research assignments (40%); in-class participation (10%).

Workload

Readings will be primarily excerpts of larger works, with a weekly reading workload of 2-4 hours. Research projects will be developed throughout the semester, with workload to be determined and divided by the students themselves.

Required reading

See course outline