Accueil > Fundamentals of International Criminal Law

OADH 4080 - Fundamentals of International Criminal Law

Type d'enseignement : Seminar

Semester : Spring 2017-2018

Number of hours : 24

Language of tuition : English

Voir les plans de cours et bibliographies

Pre-requisite

aucun

Course Description

The course is intended to give an overview of the principles of international criminal law and of the institutions that implement them. It will focus on the Rome statute establishing the International Criminal Court, but will also brush over other criminal jurisdictions, including national ones. While the course will necessarily have a strong legal component, it will treat international criminal issues from a policy point of view as well. The last session of the court will be a done in the form of a Moot Court, where students will be required to deal with a real case scenario from a criminal law and policy perspective.

Teachers

BELLAL, Annyssa (Conseillère juridique)

Course validation

Oral presentation (group work) 40%; oral participation during class 10% ; moot court exercise 40%.

Required reading

Additional required reading

  • William A. Schabas, Introduction to the International Criminal Court, 4th edn., Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011
  • Antonio Cassese, International Criminal Law, 2nd edn., Oxford University Press, 2008
  • William A. Schabas, Unimaginable atrocities, Justice, Politics and Rights at the War Crimes Tribunals, OUP, 2012

Plans de cours et bibliographies

Session 1: Introduction to international criminal law

Readings:

  • Antonio Cassese, International Criminal Law, 2nd edn., Chapter
  • Principles of International Law Recognised in the Nuremberg Judgment, Cases and Materials, p. 53
  • Fundamental Standards of Humanity, Cases and Materials, pp. 526-532.

Session 2: Universal Jurisdiction

Readings:

  • 1949 Geneva Conventions on the Protection of Victims of War: Articles 49 (GC I), 50 (GC II), 129 (GC III), 146 (GC IV);
  • 1984 Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment: Articles 5 (2) and 7(1).
  • ICJ, Questions relating to the Obligation to Prosecute or Extradite (Belgium v. Senegal), Judgment of 20 July 2012:o Summary of the judgment: pp. 1-5
  • P. Gaeta, ‘The Need Reasonably to Expand National Criminal Jurisdiction Over International Crimes’, in A. Cassese (ed.), Realizing Utopia The Future of International Law, OUP, Oxford,2012, pp. 596-606.

Session 3: International, ‘internationalised’ and national tribunals and the enforcement of international criminal law

Readings:

  • Statute of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, Cases and Materials, pp. 54-60.
  • Statute of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, Cases and Materials, pp. 61
  • Statute of the Special Court for Sierra Leone, Cases and Materials, pp. 62-66
  • Statute of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, Cases and Materials, pp. 67-72.
  • Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, Cases and Materials, pp. 73-84.

Session 4: International criminal procedures

Readings:

Session 5: War Crimes

Readings:

  • Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, Article 8.
  • Statute of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, Articles 2-3.
  • Statute of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, Article 4.
  • Statute of the Special Court for Sierra Leone, Articles 3-4.
  • Shane Darcy and Joseph Powderly (eds.), Judicial Creativity at the International Criminal Tribunals, Oxford, 2010, Chapter 5 ‘The Reinvention of War Crimes by the International Criminal Tribunals’ (Shane Darcy)

Sessions 6: Crimes Against Humanity

Readings:

  • ICC Statute: Article 7;
  • Charter of the International Military Tribunal in Nuremberg (IMTNCharter): Article 6;
  • Charter of the International Military Tribunal for the Far East (IMTFECharter): Article 5;
  • Statute of the International Criminal Tribunal for the FormerYugoslavia (ICTY Statute): Article 5;
  • Statute of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTRStatute): Article 3.
  • Cassese’s ICL, Chapter 5: ‘Crimes against Humanity’, pp. 84-108.

Optional Reading

  • G. Werle and B. Burghardt, 'Do Crimes Against Humanity Require the Participation of a State or a 'State-like' Organization?', Journal of International Criminal Justice, Vol. 10, No. 5, 2012, pp. 1151- 1170.

Session 7: Genocide

Readings:

  • ICC Statute: Article 6;
  • 1948 Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime ofGenocide: Articles II-III. Compulsory
  • C. Kress, 'The Crime of Genocide under International Law', International Criminal Law Review, Vol. 6, 2006, pp. 461-502.

Session 8: Aggression

Readings:

  • ICC Statute: Articles 8bis and 28;
  • ICTY Statute: Article 7(3);
  • ICTR Statute: Article 6(3);
  • Statute of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL Statute): Article3(2).
  • G. Gaja, 'The Long Journey towards Repressing Aggression', in A. Cassese, P. Gaeta, J. R. W. D. Jones (eds.), The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. A Commentary, Vol. I, OUP, Oxford, 2002, pp. 427-432.

Session 9: Jurisdiction and Admissibility

Readings:

  • Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, Articles 11-20
  • Statement of the Office of the Prosecutor on Iraq, Cases and Materials, pp. 513-517.
  • Declaration Recognising the Jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court, Cases and Materials, p. 518
  • UN Press Release, ‘Referral of Syria to International Criminal Court Fails as Negative Votes Prevent Security Council from Adopting Draft Resolution’, SC/11407, 22 May 2014 (situation in Syria);
  • L. Condorelli and A. Ciampi, “Comments on the Security Council Referral of the Situation in Darfur to the ICC”, Journal of International Criminal Justice, Vol. 3, No. 3, 2005, pp. 590-599

Session 10: Defences and Immunities

Readings:

  • Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, Articles 31-33.
  • Antonio Cassese, International Criminal Law, 2nd edn., Chapters 12-14.
  • Case Concerning Arrest Warrant (Yerodia case), Cases and Materials, pp. 226-229.P. Gaeta, 'Does President Al Bashir Enjoy Immunity from Arrest?’, Journal of International Criminal Justice, Vol. 7, No. 2, 2009, pp. 315-332;
  • Bellal, A., ‘The 2009 Resolution of the Institute of International Law on Immunity and International Crimes’, Journal of International Criminal Justice, (Oxford University Press) Vol. 9, Issue 1, 2011, 227-241.

Sessions 11: Amnesties

Reading:

  • Mark Freeman, Necessary Evils; Amnesties and the Search for Justice, Cambridge University Press, 2010, Chapters 4 and 5.

Session 12: the last session will be a moot court exercise