Accueil > Transatlantic Strategies: America, Europe and the Future of the West

OADI 2105 - Transatlantic Grand Strategies: America, Europe, and the Future of the West

Type d'enseignement : Seminar

Semester : Spring 2017-2018

Number of hours : 24

Language of tuition : English

Voir les plans de cours et bibliographies

Pre-requisite

aucun

Course Description

This course will examine diplomatic, economic, and military relations between the United States and Europe since the end of the Cold War and explore potential scenarios for the future of the West. The course will assess the liberal international order—buttressed by the primary institutions of the European Union, NATO, and the United Nations that express its norms and values—as well as the leadership role of various states at various times in designing, defending, and developing it. It will also appraise the effectiveness of the U.S.-EU diplomatic format in confronting current challenges. Finally, it will explore ways in which the liberal international order needs to be updated to reflect contemporary problems, interests, and distribution of power: to improve collective capacity to manage threats; to mobilize action to address shared challenges; and especially to shape updated rules of the road that govern interstate and transnational conduct in key areas. The course will be particularly useful to students interested in working in international institutions (such as the EU, NATO, and UN), foreign or defence ministries, or think tanks. It will also be useful to students interested in grand strategy and its development in specific national or international contexts. Readings will focus on transatlantic strategies during the post-Cold War period, as expressed through security strategies of the U.S., EU, and NATO. Recommended readings will provide historical context and perspectives from some of the key U.S. and European decision-makers. The course will be a mix of practical and theoretical approaches All communication should be done through: bart.szewczyk@ec.europa.eu

Teachers

SZEWCZYK, Bart (Conseiller du Président)

Pedagogical format

12 weeks Please note that the course will be a LECTURE instead of a Seminar.

Course validation

The assessment of students' performance will be based on the assessment of a written paper (60%), an oral presentation (including a short 3-5 page policy brief) (30%), and class participation (10%). The Course will count 25-30 students as a tentative maximum. The oral presentation (including the short policy brief) will be conducted in groups of two students per presentation.

Workload

2 hours; Tuesdays, 7:15pm-9:15pm

Required reading

  • 1. G. John Ikenberry, Liberal Leviathan: The Origins, Crisis, and Transformation of the American World Order (Princeton 2011)
  • 2. Luuk van Middelaar, The Passage to Europe: How a Continent Became a Union (Yale 2014)
  • 3. Henry Kissinger, World Order (Penguin 2015)
  • 4. Hal Brands, Making the Unipolar Moment: U.S. Foreign Policy and the Rise of the Post-Cold War Order (Cornell 2016)
  • 5. U.S., European, and NATO security strategies (1994-2016)

Additional required reading

  • 1. George H.W. Bush & Brent Scowcroft, A World Transformed Paperback (Vintage 1999)
  • 2. Madeleine Albright, Madame Secretary: A Memoir (Harper 2003)
  • 3. John Lewis Gaddis, The Cold War: A New History (Penguin 2005)
  • 4. Jan Zielonka, Europe As Empire: The Nature of the Enlarged European Union (Oxford 2006)
  • 5. Giandomenico Majone, Europe as the Would-be World Power: The EU at Fifty (Cambridge 2009)
  • 6. Condoleezza Rice, No Higher Honor: A Memoir of My Years in Washington (Crown 2011)
  • 7. Bart Szewczyk, European Citizenship and National Democracy: Contemporary Sources of Legitimacy of the European Union, 17 Colum. J. Eur. L. 151 (2011)
  • 8. Bart Szewczyk , Enlargement and Legitimacy of the EU, 30 Polish YB Int'l L 131 (2011)
  • 9. Michael E. O'Hanlon, et al. Bending History: Barack Obama's Foreign Policy (Brookings 2012)
  • 10. Bart Szewczyk, Variable Multipolarity and UN Security Council Reform, 53 Harv. Int'l L. J. 451 (2012)
  • 11. Melvyn P. Leffler, The Foreign Policies of the George W. Bush Administration: Memoirs, History, Legacy, Diplomatic History (2013)
  • 12. Jan Zielonka, Is the EU Doomed? (Polity 2014)
  • 13. Joseph S. Nye, Jr., Is the American Century Over? (Polity 2015)
  • 14. Gideon Rose, What Obama Gets Right. Keep Calm and Carry the Liberal Order On, 94 Foreign Affairs (2015)
  • 15. Stanley Sloan, Defense of the West: NATO, the European Union and the Transatlantic Bargain (Manchester 2016)
  • 16. Derek Chollet, The Long Game (PublicAffairs 2016)
  • 17. Joseph S. Nye, Jr., Will the Liberal Order Survive?, 96 Foreign Affairs 10-17 (2017)
  • 18. Richard N. Haass, A World in Disarray (Penguin 2017)
  • 19. William Drozdziak , Fractured Continent (Norton 2017)
  • 20. Thomas Wright, All Measures Short of War (Yale 2017)
  • 21. Ivan Krastev, After Europe (Penn 2017)

Plans de cours et bibliographies

Please find below a proposed outline based upon 12 sessions, to be filled in. Should you prefer to use a non-standard outline, please feel free to use the « non-standard course outline » area at the bottom of this document. In both cases please indicate required and/or recommended readings.

Séance 1: World Order and U.S. Primacy: 1992-2017

Required readings:

  • Henry Kissinger, World Order (2015) (only Conclusion chapter)
  • Hal Brands, Making the Unipolar Moment: U.S. Foreign Policy and the Rise of the Post-Cold War Order (2016) (pgs. 274-362)

Recommended readings:

  • John Lewis Gaddis, The Cold War: A New History (2005)

Séance 2: Liberal International Order: View from America

Required readings:

  • G. John Ikenberry, Liberal Leviathan: The Origins, Crisis, and Transformation of the American World Order (2011)

Recommended readings:

  • Joseph S. Nye, Jr., Is the American Century Over? (2015)

Séance 3: Liberal International Order: View from Europe

Required readings:

  • Luuk van Middelaar, The Passage to Europe: How a Continent Became a Union (2014) (pgs. 181-312)

Recommended readings:

  • Giandomenico Majone, Europe as the Would-be World Power: The EU at Fifty (2009)
  • Christopher J. Bickerton, Dermot Hodson, and Uwe Puetter, eds., The New Intergovernmentalism: States and Supranational Actors in the Post-Maastricht Era (2015)

Séance 4: Engagement and Enlargement: 1993-2000

Required readings: 

  • U.S. National Security Strategy: Engagement and Enlargement (1994)
  • U.S. National Security Strategy: For A New Century (1997)

Recommended readings:

  • George H.W. Bush & Brent Scowcroft, A World Transformed Paperback (1999)
  • Madeleine Albright, Madame Secretary: A Memoir (2003)

Séance 5: America Unbound: 2001-2008

Required readings:

  • U.S. National Security Strategy (2002)
  • U.S. National Security Strategy (2006)

Recommended readings:

  • Condoleezza Rice, No Higher Honor: A Memoir of My Years in Washington (2011)
  • Melvyn P. Leffler, The Foreign Policies of the George W. Bush Administration: Memoirs, History, Legacy, Diplomatic History (2013)

Séance 6: EU and NATO: 1995-2013

Required readings:

  • European Security Strategy (2003)
  • NATO Strategic Concept (2010)

Recommended readings:

  • Jan Zielonka, Europe As Empire: The Nature of the Enlarged European Union (2006)
  • Bart Szewczyk, Enlargement and Legitimacy of the European Union, 30 Polish YB Int'l L 131 (2011)
  • Stanley Sloan, Defense of the West (2016)

Séance 7: Student Presentations on American Strategies: 1992-2008

Séance 8: Student Presentations on European Strategies: 1992-2008

Séance 9: Hope and Change: 2009-2013

Required readings:

  • U.S. National Security Strategy (2010)
  • Bart Szewczyk, Variable Multipolarity and UN Security Council Reform - 53 Harv. Int'l L. J. 451 (2012)

Recommended readings:

  • Michael E. O'Hanlon, et al. Bending History: Barack Obama's Foreign Policy (2012)
  • Derek Chollet, The Long Game: How Obama Defied Washington and Redefined America's Role in the World (2016)

Séance 10: Crises and Challenges: 2014-2017

Required readings:

  • U.S. National Security Strategy (2015)
  • EU Global Strategy (2016)

Recommended readings:

  • Gideon Rose, What Obama Gets Right. Keep Calm and Carry the Liberal Order On, 94 Foreign Affairs (2015)
  • NATO-EU Joint Declaration of Strategic Partnership (2016)
  • Joseph S. Nye, Jr, Will the Liberal Order Survive? The History of an Idea, 96 Foreign Affairs 10-17 (2017)
  • Richard N. Haass, A World in Disarray: American Foreign Policy and the Crisis of the Old Order (2017)
  • Thomas Wright, All Measures Short of War: The Contest for the 21st Century and the Future of American Power (2017)
  • William Drozdziak, Fractured Continent: Europe's Crises and the Fate of the West (2017)
  • Ivan Krastev, After Europe (2017).

Séance 11: Student Presentations on American Strategies, 2009-2017

Séance 12: Student Presentations on European Strategies, 2009-2017

Biographical Information

Dr. Bart M.J. Szewczyk is currently an Adviser at the European Commission's European Political Strategy Centre, where he focuses on transatlantic relations and defence, as well as a Non-Resident Senior Fellow at the German Marshall Fund.  Previously, between 2014 and 2017, he served as Member of Secretary John Kerry's Policy Planning Staff at the U.S. Department of State and Senior Policy Advisor to Ambassador Samantha Power at the U.S. Mission to the United Nations.  (He is most likely the first person to serve at senior levels within the U.S. government and EU institutions.) He joined the U.S. government as one of two academics selected for the Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellowship in 2014.  Before government, he taught at Columbia Law School and the George Washington University Law School.  In 2013, he was selected as one of the Top 99 under 33 Foreign Policy Leaders by the Young Professionals in Foreign Policy.  He has published in the Harvard International Law Journal, Global Peace Operations Review, Columbia Journal of European Law, American Journal of International Law, Polish Yearbook of International Law, the George Washington University Law Review, and with the EU Institute for Security Studies. He holds a PhD from Cambridge University, where he studied as a Gates Scholar, and a JD from Yale Law School.