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OCEU 2100 - EU Negotiations in a Global Context

Type d'enseignement : Seminar

Semester : Spring 2017-2018

Number of hours : 24

Language of tuition : English

Voir les plans de cours et bibliographies

Pre-requisite

aucun

Course Description

Negotiation constitutes a strategic skill for managers, administrators, civil servants and many other professional careers. Be it internally (with colleagues, team members, or hierarchy), or externally (with stakeholders, national administrations or international organizations), negotiation capabilities can make a difference. This workshop will help students to: gain an intellectual understanding of negotiators' behavior and of central concepts in negotiation as they apply in the European Union and global context; improve their ability to analyze the negotiation situation and learn how to develop a toolkit of useful negotiation skills, strategies, and approaches adapted to work in the European and international institutional context.

Teachers

MARCHI, Francesco (Directeur Programme de Formation et Recherche (ESSEC))

Pedagogical format

The course will follow a three step sequential approach: Experiential learning through simulations: In each session students will engage in an exercise or a simulation pertaining to a key aspect of negotiation in the EU. Debriefing, feedback & self-examination: After the practice, the instructor will lead a discussion that involves analyzing students' performance so that the class can analyze the relationship between different negotiation strategies and outcomes and learn from everyone's experiences. Discussion of a case study: during the last part of each session the instructor will discuss with students the relevant research findings that are connected with the seminar key learning points and the specific aspects of the EU negotiation situation analyzed.

Course validation

This course has no specific requirements. The assessment is based on different activites : 50% class participation, 20% EUNegotiationLab blog participation, 30% final paper (3000 words).

Required reading

  • Lempereur A. , Colson A. (2010) The First Move, New York, Wiley, (Ch. 1, 2 & 3)
  • Druckman, D. (2010) Negotiation, in N. Young (Ed.) The International Encyclopedia of Peace, New York: Oxford University Press
  • Elgström, O. and Jonsson, M. (2000) “Negotiation in the European Union: bargaining or problem-solving.”, Journal of European Public Policy, vol.7: n°5. pp 673-822

Additional required reading

  • Delreux T. (2014) EU actorness, cohesiveness and effectiveness in environmental affairs, in Journal of European Public Policy, Vol. 21, Iss. 7, 2014
  • Marchi F. (2015) The Convention on the future of Europe: how states behave in a new institutional context of negotiation, Peter Lang, Brussels (Ch. 2 pp.35-53)
  • Tallberg, J. (2008) “Bargaining Power in the European Council”, Journal of Common Market Studies, Volume 46, Issue 3, June 2008, pp. 685-708
  • Vanhoonacker S. et al. (2011) The Presidency in EU External Relations: Who is at the helm?, in Politique européenne, 2011/3 (n° 35) pp. 139-164
  • Zartman W. (1994) “Introduction: Two's a Company more's a Crowd: the Complexities of Multilateral Negotiations”, in Zartman W. (Ed) International Multilateral Negotiation: Approaches to the Management of Complexity, Jossey-Bass: San Francisco

Plans de cours et bibliographies

Sessions 1-2: Understanding the key concepts and theories of negotiation

Simulation exercise:
EU BORDER CONTROL MISSION: A team negotiation over the crossing border conditions and access between two neighborhood countries.

  • Three dimension of negotiation: people, substance, process
  • Cooperation Vs. Competitive strategies,
  • Consistency Vs. Pragmatism,
  • Assertiveness Vs. Empathy,
  • Principal Vs. Agent;

Readings:

  • Druckman, D. (2010) Negotiation, in N. Young (Ed.) The International Encyclopedia of Peace, New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Lempereur A., Colson A. (2010) Méthode de négociation. Paris : Dunod, (Ch. 1)

Sessions 3-4: How to prepare and conduct a negotiation in team

Simulation:
THE NORKET DISTRICT: Bilateral negotiation of a civilian crisis between a central governement and a regional entity
10 key trumps for effective preparation and agenda setting

  • Typical models of negotiation dynamic and process
  • Delegation and team management

Readings:

  • Lempereur A. , Colson A. (2010) Méthode de négociation. Paris : Dunod, (Ch. 2)

Sessions 5-6: Distributive and integrative Negotiations

Simulation:
THE AGENTIA LtD.: Team negotiation between the EU and a developing country on the yearly budget allocation

  • Competitive and integrative negotiations
  • Concession making
  • Distributive vs. Procedural Justice

Readings:

  • Elgström, O. and Jonsson, M. (2000) “Negotiation in the European Union: bargaining or problem-solving.”, Journal of European Public Policy, vol.7: n°5. pp 673-822.

Sessions 7-8: Negotiating an FTA agreement on behalf of the EU

Simulation:
THE EU-KANDONESIA SUMMIT: Bilateral negotiation FTA agreement between the EU and an Asian power

  • Preparation in team
  • Consultation of stakeholders
  • Internal and external communication
  • Issue linkage and trade-offs

Readings: Readings:

  • Conceição, E. (2014) When Speaking with a Single Voice Isn't Enough: Bargaining Power (A)symmetry and EU External Effectiveness in Global Trade Governance, in Journal of European Public Policy 21(7): 980-995
  • Albin C., Druckman D. (2014) Procedures matter: Justice and effectiveness in international trade negotiations, in European Journal of International Relations, 20 (4) , pp. 1014-1042.

Sessions 9-10: Climate Change negotiations and the EU

Simulation:
THE COP 21 CLIMATE CONFERENCE-

  • Vertical Vs. horizontal disconnection
  • The role of scientific expertise in negotiation
  • The importance of procedural Vs. distributive justice

Discussion:
The EU actorness in international fora
Readings: Readings:

  • Delreux T. (2014) EU actorness, cohesiveness and effectiveness in environmental affairs, in Journal of European Public Policy, Vol. 21, Iss. 7, 2014
  • Niemann A. and Bretherton C. (2013) EU external policy at the crossroads: The challenge of actorness and effectiveness, in International Relations, 27 (3), pp. 261-275.

Sessions 11-12: The External action of the EU in multilateral fora

Simulation:
The KASLOWIA PEACE CONFERENCE: A multilateral meeting for a peace conference in which the EU and some Member States are represented to solve a major civilo-military crisis.

  • The role of the Presidency and the Chair
  • Formal Vs. informal negotiation
  • Agreement Vs. Implementation
  • Transparency Vs. secrecy in negotiations

Readings:

  • Zartman W. (1994) “Introduction: Two’s a Company more’s a Crowd: the Complexities of Multilateral Negotiations”, in Zartman W. (Ed) International Multilateral Negotiation: Approaches to the Management of Complexity, Jossey-Bass: San Francisco;
  • Vanhoonacker S. et al. (2011) The Presidency in EU External Relations: Who is at the helm?, in Politique européenne, 2011/3 (n° 35) pp. 139-164

Biographical Information

Francesco Marchi is Director of the research and training program “Negotiators of Europe” at the Institute for Research and Education on Negotiation (ESSEC IRÉNÉ). He regularly delivers training on negotiation techniques to European institutions officials from the Commission, the European Parliament, and the EEAS. He is adjunct professor of Political Science and Negotiation at the ESSEC Business School where he teaches in the Master and MBA Programs. He also teaches a course of International Negotiation Analysis at the College of Europe, a course of negotiation at ENA (Strasbourg) and at the Master of Global Politics and Euro-Mediterranean Relations of the University of Catania (Italy). He holds a PhD in Political Science from the Institut d’études politiques of Paris (Sciences Po) and his research focus on the negotiating behavior of EU institutions’ officials.