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KINT 4430 - INTRODUCTION TO CRITICAL SECURITY STUDIES

Type d'enseignement : Lecture alone

Semester : Autumn 2018-2019

Number of hours : 24

Language of tuition : English

Voir les plans de cours et bibliographies

Pre-requisite

None.

Course Description

This course introduces students to questions of security and focuses on how security can be approached from critical perspectives and how security is important in defining the political boundaries of our (international) society. Beyond the different critical approaches that will be engaged with during the course – from human security to poststructuralism or from gender to postcolonialism –, the course focuses on specific issues, like migration, nuclear proliferation, political violence or surveillance, to illustrate how critical approaches to security can shed a different light on these important contemporary questions. The course also concentrates on a substantial self-designed research paper and the development of key research skills.

Teachers

  • GUILLAUME, Xavier (Professor)
  • XU, Chong (Ph.D. in History)

Pedagogical format

The class is organised in 12 sessions of 2 hours each, grouped in 6 clusters of 2 sessions. Each session consists of 1 hour and a half of lecture and about 15-20 minutes of discussion.

Course validation

The final grade will be represented by a small essay (40%) due mid-October and research-based essay (60%) due by the end of the semester. In-class participation (extra bonus) will be taken into account if the class dynamic, and number, enables it. The essay will be about 2,500 words. The research-based essay will be about 4,000 words, the topic of which and "problématique" having to be agreed upon with the course instructor.

Workload

It is expected that students come prepared for each session, having read the compulsory texts ahead of the session to help understanding the course material as well as inform the in-class discussion.

Required reading

  • Book: Columbia Peoples and Nick Vaughan-Williams. 2010. Critical Security Studies. An Introduction. London: Routledge
  • Zedner, Lucia. 2009. Security. London: Routledge

Plans de cours et bibliographies

Session 1: Introduction: what are (critical) security studies?
Required readings:

  • Peoples and Vaughan-Williams, Introduction.
  • Zedner, Lucia. 2009. Security. London: Routledge, chapters 1-2.

Recommended readings: see also syllabus

  • Buzan, Barry and Lene Hansen. 2009. The evolution of international security studies. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, chapter 1.

Session 2: Security and the political
Required readings:

  • Zedner, Lucia. 2009. Security. London: Routledge, chapter 3.
  • Huysmans, Jef. 1998. “Security! What do you mean? From concept to thick signifier”, European Journal of International Relations 4(2), pp. 226-255.

Recommended readings: see syllabus

Session 3: Security as emancipation: Human security
Required readings:

  • Peoples and Vaughan-Williams, chapter 1.
  • Thomas, Caroline. 2001. Global governance, development and human security. The challenge of poverty and inequality. London: Pluto Press, chapter 1.
  • Booth, Ken. 2007. Theory of world security. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, chapter 3, & pp. 321-336.

Recommended readings: see syllabus

Session 4: On Critical Methods in Security Studies
Required readings:

  • Aradau, Claudia, Huysmans, Jef, Neal, Andrew and Voelkner, Nadine. 2015.“Introducing critical security methods”, in Claudia Aradau, Jef Huymans, Andrew Neal and Nadine Voelkner (eds.) Critical Security Methods. New Frameworks for Analysis. London: Routledge.
  • Salter, Mark B. 2013. “Introduction”, in Mark B. Salter and Can E. Mutlu (eds.) Research Methods in Critical Security Studies. An Introduction. London: Routledge.
  • Burgess, Peter J. 2014. “Commensurability and methods in critical security studies”. Critical Studies in Security 2(3), pp. 356-358.
  • Jarvis, Lee. 2013. “Conclusion: The process, practice and ethics of research”, in Laura J. Shepherd (ed.) Critical Approaches to Security. An Introduction to Theories and Methods. London: Routledge.

Recommended readings: see syllabus

Session 5: The construction of threat and enmity: insecurity
Required readings:

  • Weldes, Jutta; Laffey, Mark; Gusterson, Hugh and Duvall, Raymond. 1999. “Introduction: constructing insecurity”, in Jutta Weldes, Mark Laffey, Hugh Gusterson, and Raymond Duvall (eds.) Cultures of insecurity. States, communities, and the production of danger. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
  • Bialasiewicz, Luiza, David Campbell, Stuart Elden, Stephen Graham, Alex Jeffrey, and Alison J Williams. 2007. “Performing Security: The Imaginative Geographies of Current US Strategy.” Political Geography 26(4), pp. 405-422.
  • Doty, Roxanne L. 1993. “Foreign policy as social construction: A post-positivist analysis of U.S. counterinsurgency policy in the Philippines”. International Studies Quarterly 37(3), pp.297–320.

Recommended readings: see syllabus

Session 6: Orientalism and nuclear weapons
Required readings:

  • Peoples and Vaughan-Williams, chapter 3.
  • Barkawi, Tarak and Laffey, Mark. 2006. “The postcolonial moment in security studies,” Review of International Studies 32(2), pp. 329-352.
  • Gusterson, Hugh. 1999. “Nuclear Weapons and the Other in the Western Imagination.” Cultural Anthropology 14(1), pp. 111-143.
  • Biswas, Shampa. 2013. “Post-colonial security studies”, in Laura J. Shepherd (ed.) Critical Approaches to Security. An Introduction to Theories and Methods. London: Routledge.

Recommended readings: see syllabus

Session 7: The securitization framework
Required readings:

  • Buzan, Barry, Wæver, Ole, and Jaap de Wilde. 1998. Security. A New Framework for Analysis. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publisher, chapters 1 and 2.
  • Vuori, Juha A. 2008. “Illocutionary Logic and Strands of Securitization: Applying the Theory of Securitization to the Study of Non-Democratic Political Orders”. European Journal of International Relations 14(1), pp.65–99.
  • Wæver, Ole. 1995. “Securitization and Desecuritization”. In Ronnie D. Lipschutz (ed.) On Security. New York: Columbia University Press.

Recommended readings: see syllabus

Session 8: Voice, Silence and Securitization
Required readings:

  • Hansen, Lene. 2000. “The Little Mermaid's Silent Security Dilemma and the Absence of Gender in the Copenhagen School”. Millennium: Journal of International Studies 29(2), pp.285–306.
  • Wilkinson, Claire. 2007. “The Copenhagen School on Tour in Kyrgyzstan: Is Securitization Theory Useable Outside Europe?” Security Dialogue 38(1), pp.5–25.
  • Guillaume, Xavier. Manuscript. “How to do things with silence: Rethinking the centrality of speech to the securitization framework”.

Recommended readings: see syllabus

Session 9: Feminism, gender and political violence
Required readings:

  • Peoples and Vaughan-Williams, chapters 2 and 7.
  • Stern, Maria. 2006. “‘We’ the subject: the power of failure of (in)security”, Security Dialogue 37(2), pp. 187-205.
  • Alison, Miranda. 2004. “Women as agents of political violence: gendering security”, Security Dialogue 35(4), pp. 447-463.
  • Åhäll, Linda. 2012. “The writing of heroines: Motherhood and female agency in political violence.” Security Dialogue 43(4), pp.287–303.

Recommended readings: see syllabus

Session 10: Technology, information and surveillance
Required readings:

  • Peoples and Vaughan-Williams, chapter 10.
  • Lyon, David. 2006. “The search for surveillance theories”, in David Lyon (ed.) Theorizing surveillance. The panopticon and beyond. Cullompton: Willan Publishing, pp. 3-20.
  • Salter, Mark B. 2006. “The global visa regime and the political technologies of the international self: borders, bodies, biopolitics”, Alternatives: Global, Local, Political, 31(2), pp. 167-189.

Recommended readings: see syllabus

Session 11: The international political sociology of security
Required readings:

  • Abrahamsen, Rita and Williams, Michael C. 2009. “Security beyond the state: Global security assemblages in international politics”, International Political Sociology 3(1), pp. 1-17.
  • Bigo, Didier. 2006. “Internal and external aspects of security”, European Security 15(4), pp. 385-404.
  • Loader, Ian. 1999. “Consumer culture and the commodification of policing and security”, Sociology 33(2), pp. 373-392.

Recommended readings: see syllabus

Session 12: Conclusion

  • Required readings: none for this session

Biographical Information

Xavier Guillaume currently is Assistant Professor in International Relations at the Rijksuniversiteit Groningen. He specializes in international political and social theory with a focus on problématiques concerned with the nexus between identity and alterity or security and citizenship. Among his most recent publications include the first handbook on international political sociology (co-edited with Pınar Bilgin, Routledge 2017), his monograph International Relations and Identity (Routledge 2011) and an edited volume with Jef Huysmans Citizenship and Security (Routledge 2013). Other publications pertaining to security studies include: “Making norms visible: police uniforms and the social meaning of policing” (with Rune S. Andersen and Juha A. Vuori in Visual Aspects of Security, 2018), “Paint it black: Colours and the social meaning of the battlefield” (with Juha A. Vuori and Rune S. Andersen, EJIR 2016), “A Chromatology of Security: Introducing Colour to Visual Security Studies” (with Juha A. Vuori and Rune S. Andersen, Security Dialogue, 2015), c.a.s.e. collective “Critical Approaches to Security in Europe: A Networked Manifesto” (c.a.se. collective, Security Dialogue, 2006).