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KINT 4440 - ORGANIZATION THEORY AND GLOBALIZATION

Type d'enseignement : Seminar

Semester : Autumn 2018-2019

Number of hours : 24

Language of tuition : English

Voir les plans de cours et bibliographies

Pre-requisite

aucun

Course Description

In contemporary societies, organizations and institutions are among the most important meso- and macro-level social structures filtering human action into coordination. They make it possible for interdependent and often conflicting members –often heterogeneous and competing– to act collectively and to cooperate at various levels (intra- and inter-organizational, local and global). This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of organization theory from a sociological perspective: control and efficiency; bureaucracy and collegiality; interdependencies and resources; power and exchange; etc. It looks at the recursive ways in which the environment shapes organizations (technology, professions, and markets), and in which organizations shape their environments, including social stratification and contribution to the reproduction of inequalities. It will then question the value of this set of concepts at the international level and in the age of globalization. Special emphasis will be put on emerging institutions and the meaning of an ‘organizational society' at the international level from a network perspective.

Teachers

LAZEGA, Emmanuel (Professeur des Universités à Sciences Po)

Pedagogical format

The class format is lecture for the first eight weeks, then presentations of short research projects by the students. Attend the lectures and do the required readings every week. Take the midterm exam. Halfway through the semester, a multiple-choice exam will test your readings for previous sessions. The quiz will take place on session 6. Session 5 will include a review and discussion session. Carry out a short research project based on an empirical case study, present it as a ppt for the whole class and write a short text (10-20 pages, 1.5 spacing; +/- 10%) summarizing your results. This work can be carried out individually or collectively. A common topic will be proposed, and work divided among teams, jointly with the professor. The ppt presentations will be scheduled during week 3. The text is due by the end of the semester. In these 10-20 pages, you must summarize the problem you chose, the organization or organizational field that you researched, the data you collected, your analyses and the results. Drawing on your readings, you must also introduce a comparative dimension into your work and reflection, and use it to question the role of organizations and institutions in the current globalization. Grading weights: Midterm exam: 50%. Collective ppt presentation: 25%. Collective report on research project: 25%. Additional requested information (12 weeks): Reading requirements for this course are listed in the syllabus. Please read the assigned text (“Required reading”) before class. Read or browse through the “Recommended readings” if you are interested in the specific topic of the session. Texts are available on the moodle of the course. Books are available at the Sciences Po library.

Course validation

Attend the lectures and participate, do the required readings every week and review the ppts of previous week's course. Take the midterm Quiz. Team up for short research project and prepare common ppt presentation + research essay on the project. This research essay can be replaced with a policy brief. Grading weights: Midterm Quiz: 50%, Ppt and Critical essay/policy brief: 50%.

Workload

Reading requirements for this course are listed in the syllabus. Please read the assigned text (“Reading for this week”) before class. Read or browse through the “suggested” texts if you are interested in the specific topic. Most texts are accessible on the website of the course or will be emailed to the students. The books are available at the Sciences Po library. This syllabus may be slightly modified as circumstances warrant. One reading per week, ≤ to 3 hours

Required reading

  • Reading requirements for this course are listed in the syllabus. Please read the assigned text (“Reading for this week”) before class. Read or browse through the “suggested” texts if you are interested in the specific topic. Most texts are accessible on the website of the course or will be emailed to the students. The books are available at the Sciences Po library.
  • 1. Charles Perrow (1991), “A Society of Organizations.” Theory and Society, 20: 725-762
  • 2. Crozier, M. & Friedberg, E., (1995), “Organizations and collective action: Our contribution to organization analysis”, in Bacharach, S.R., Gagliardi, P., and Mundell, B. (eds), Studies of organizations in the European tradition, Greenwich, CT.: JAI Press
  • 3. Emmanuel Lazega (2001), The Collegial phenomenon, Oxford Univ. Press, Chapter 7
  • 4. Charles Perrow, Complex Organizations, Chapter 5, “The Institutional school” and Readings 5 . Charles Perrow (1999), Normal Accidents: Living with high-risk technologies, Princeton UP, Introduction and Chapter 1

Plans de cours et bibliographies

Week 1: Introduction: From organizations and institutions to the social processes of the organizational society at the international level
Suggested readings for this week:

  • Perrow, C.. (1991). “A Society of Organizations.” Theory and Society, 20: 725-762

Suggested readings for this week (browse):

  • Centeno, M.A. and Cohen, J.N. (2010), Global capitalism: A sociological perspective, Malden, MA: Polity Press.

Week 2: Weberian bureaucracy, hierarchy and Taylorism
Reading for this week:

  • Perrow, C., Complex Organizations, Chapter 1, “Why bureaucracy?”

Suggested readings for this week (browse):

  • Weber, M. “Bureaucracy,” in Economy and Society

Week 3: Challenges to bureaucracy from within the organization
Reading for this week:

  • Crozier, M. & Friedberg, E., (1995), “Organizations and collective action: Our contribution to organization analysis”, in Bacharach, S.R., Gagliardi, P., and Mundell, B. (eds), Studies of organizations in the European tradition, Greenwich, CT.: JAI Press 

Suggested readings for this week (browse):

  • Perrow, C., Complex Organizations, Chapters 3 and 4, “The Human relations model”, “The Neo-Weberian model: Decision making, conflict and technology”.
  • The ppt presentations for Weeks 9 to 11 will be scheduled during this Week 3.

Week 4 : Collegiality, committees, networks and collective action among rival peers
Reading for this week:

  • Lazega, E. (2001), The Collegial phenomenon, Introduction and Chapter 1, Oxford University Press

Week 5: How the environment shapes organizations and institutions: technology, professions, and markets

This session includes a review and discussion session, preparing for next week’s Quiz. Prepare your questions, if any.
Reading for this week:

  • Perrow, C., Complex Organizations, Chapter 6, “The environment”

Suggested readings for this week (browse):

  • Bosk, Ch. (1979), Forgive and Remember, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Davis, G.F. (2010), “Firms and environments”, in N.Smelser and R.Swedberg (Eds), Handbook of Economic Sociology, Princeton, NJ: Russell Sage Foundation.

Week 6 : How organizations and institutions shape their environment
Readings for this week:

  • Tilly, Ch. (1999), Durable Inequality, Chapter 5.
  • Review previous readings and ppts for this week’s Midterm Quiz

Suggested readings for this week (browse):

  • Perrow, C. (1999), Normal Accidents: Living with high-risk technologies, Princeton UP, Introduction and chapter 1
  • Halliday, T.C. and Carruthers, B.C. (2009), Bankrupt: Global lawmaking and systemic financial crisis, Stanford UP
  • Picciotto, S. (2011), Regulating global corporate capitalism, Cambridge UP
  • MCQ  MIDTERM QUIZ (20mn)

Week 7: Governance
Readings for this week:

  • Drori, G.S. (2006), "Governed by governance: The new prism for organizational change", in Drori, G.S. Meyer, J.W. and Hwang, H. (eds)(2006), Globalization and organization: World society and organizational change, Oxford University Press.

Suggested reading for this week (browse):

  • Meyer, J.W., Boli, J., Thomas, G.M. and Ramirez, F.O., (1997), "World Society and the Nation‐State ",  American Journal of Sociology, 103:144-181
  • Mendel, P. (2006), "The Making and expansion of international management standards : The global diffusion if ISO 9000 Quality management certificates", in Drori, G.S. Meyer, J.W. and Hwang, H. (eds)(2006), Globalization and organization: World society and organizational change, Oxford University Press

Week 8: Networks and institutional entrepreneurship
Readings for this week:

  • Lazega, E. (2012), "Learning through lobbying: Mapping judicial dialogue across national borders among European intellectual property judges", Utrecht Law Review, http://www.utrechtlawreview.org, Volume 8, Issue 2 (May) 2012.

Suggested reading for this week (browse):

  • Thornton, P.H. and Ocasio, W.(2007), "Institutional Logics", in R.Greenwood, Ch. Oliver, R.Suddaby, K.Sahlin-Andersson, The Sage Handbook of Organizational Institutionalism, London: Sage

Weeks 9 to 11:

  • Presentations of student groups’ research projects

Week 12: Conclusion and discussion

BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

Overview
In contemporary societies, organizations and institutions are among the most important meso- and macro-level social structures filtering human action into coordination. They make it possible for interdependent and often conflicting members –often heterogeneous and competing– to act collectively and to cooperate at various levels (intra- and inter-organizational, local and global). This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of organization theory from a sociological perspective: control and efficiency; bureaucracy and collegiality; interdependencies and resources; power and exchange; etc. It looks at the recursive ways in which the environment shapes organizations (technology, professions, and markets), and in which organizations shape their environments, including social stratification and contribution to the reproduction of inequalities. It will then question the value of this set of concepts at the international level and in the age of globalization. Special emphasis will be put on emerging institutions and the meaning of an ‘organizational society’ at the international level from a network perspective.