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KINT 7775 - International Development Cooperation

Type d'enseignement : Seminar

Semester : Autumn 2018-2019

Number of hours : 24

Language of tuition : English

Voir les plans de cours et bibliographies

Pre-requisite

None. Prior development work is a plus

Course Description

The course aims at providing students with the necessary knowledge and analytical skills to evaluate the policy relevance and effectiveness of international development cooperation, to understand the new emerging aid architecture and the different bilateral/multilateral initiatives. Through an interactive analysis of the evolution of development cooperation and its historical, political and socio-economic dimensions, students will be introduced to the fundamental elements of international aid; including the post-2015 development agenda, the different actors, global trends. Students will gain insights on the practical application of development cooperation policies, as well as an appreciation of key concepts such as development finance. Through class debates, students will acquire an understanding of the contemporary debates concerning the value, credibility and significance of development cooperation that dominate the academic and practitioners' fields and will be able to assess the relationship between global governance and poverty reduction. Particular emphasis will be given to the role of the European Union - as the biggest aid donor - and its policy coherence; the new challenges of international development cooperation and the new role of south-south cooperation.

Indicative Reading List: 1. Easterley W. (2007) ‘Are AID Agencies Improving?'. Brookings Institution, NYU. Download: http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/papers/2007/10/09foreignaid-easterly/09foreignaid_easterly.pdf 2. Hulme, D.(2015), ‘Global Poverty Global governance and poor people in the Post-2015 Era' 2nd ed. Routledge. 3. Acemoglu, D and Robinson J.(2013) ‘Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty', Crown Business. 4. United Nations (2015) ‘Addis Ababa Action Agenda of the third International Conference on Financing for development'. New York Download: http://www.un.org/esa/ffd/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/AAAA_Outcome.pdf 5. Council, EP and COM (2017) ‘New European consensus on development. our world, our dignity, our future', Joint statement by the Council of the EU, European Parliament and European Commission. Brussels, 7 June 2017. Download: https://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/sites/devco/files/european-consensus-on-development-final-20170626_en.pdf 6. Lin, J., & Wang, Y. (2017). ‘South-South Development Cooperation Helps Structural Transformation. In Going Beyond Aid: Development Cooperation for Structural Transformation (pp. 86-105). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Teachers

PIMENTA, Isabel (Cooperation Officer - Economist)

Pedagogical format

The course will consist of lectures and debates. Lectures will introduce the key topics and concepts of each theme. Lecture notes and reading list will be distributed in advance. Students are expected to participate actively in the discussions and express their views. The lectures will be complemented by debates discussing relevant topics. Students will be divided into eight groups. In each debate, two groups will participate and will have to defend pre-established and opposing positions. Each group will present their first arguments through a presentation. The other groups will act as the jury.

Course validation

- Participation in the debates (30%)
- A 1500-2000 word essay (30%)
- Closed-book two-hour written exam (40%). Two questions out of four will have to be answered.

Workload

A total of twelve sessions of two hours each delivered in six weeks (four hours per week). Debates will require supplementary readings and independent research prior to the sessions.

Required reading

  • Easterley W. (2007) ‘Are AID Agencies Improving?'. Brookings Institution, NYU. Download: http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/papers/2007/10/09foreignaid-easterly/09foreignaid_easterly.pdf
  • Hulme, D.(2015), ‘Global Poverty Global governance and poor people in the Post-2015 Era' 2nd ed. Routledge.
  • Acemoglu, D and Robinson J.(2013) ‘Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty', Crown Business.
  • United Nations (2015) ‘Addis Ababa Action Agenda of the third International Conference on Financing for development'. New York Download: http://www.un.org/esa/ffd/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/AAAA_Outcome.pdf
  • Council, EP and COM (2017) ‘New European consensus on development. our world, our dignity, our future', Joint statement by the Council of the EU, European Parliament and European Commission. Brussels, 7 June 2017. Download: https://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/sites/devco/files/european-consensus-on-development-final-20170626_en.pdf

Additional required reading

Lin, J., & Wang, Y. (2017). ‘South-South Development Cooperation Helps Structural Transformation. In Going Beyond Aid: Development Cooperation for Structural Transformation (pp. 86-105). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Plans de cours et bibliographies

Session 1&2: Introduction to international political economy and overview of the historical evolution of International Cooperation.
Description:

  • Overview of the course contents, objectives and assessment method.
  • Evolution of development cooperation in the post-WWII international arena, through emerging dynamics: Cold War and decolonisation. Birth of multilateral financial organisations and initiatives and interplay with bilateral actions. The road to globalisation and the notion of ‘global public goods’. Understanding the political economy of international cooperation, along with the different actors, their motivations and interests.

Indicative reading list:
A detailed reading list will be provided after the first session.

  • Martin, Lisa L. (1999): The Political Economy of International Cooperation. In Inge Kaul, Isabelle Grunberg, Marc A. Stern (Eds.): Global public goods. International cooperation in the 21st century. Oxford: Oxford University Press; New York.
  • Axelrod, R.; Keohane, R. (1985): Achieving Cooperation under Anarchy: Strategies and Institutions. In World Politics 38 (1), pp. 226–254.
  • Acemoglu, D and Robinson J.(2013) ‘Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty’, Crown Business.

Assignment for this session:

  • Prepare for the next session debate. Topic of the debate to be defined at the beginning of the course.

Session 3&4: The flow of aid and the international development agenda.
Description:

  • The patterns of aid, investment, trade and remittance flows across geographical and sectoral dimensions. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the global framework for financing development post-2015. Understanding the key concepts of domestic revenue mobilisation, public finance management and debt management.
  • The role of international financial institutions, regional development banks, private sector financing and the quest for non-traditional/innovative forms of financing. The functioning of various aid instruments: grants, budget support, concession and non-concessional loans, equity instruments and public-private partnerships among others.
  • Case study evaluating the impact of financial flows (investment, trade, aid, remittances) from a recipient-country perspective. 
  • Followed by first debate.

Indicative reading list:

Assignment for this session:

  • Prepare for the next session debate. Topic of the debate to be defined at the beginning of the course.

Session 5&6: Dilemmas in Aid Effectiveness
Description:

  • Global governance of aid system and international development commitments: empirical evidence of successes, shortcomings and the way forward. Empowerment or aid dependency? Growing aid-scepticism, amidst global economic downturn and subsequent fiscal constraints and its influence on development policy formulation. The goal of aid effectiveness through national ownership, alignment with national development priorities, targeting policy coherence and the reduction of aid fragmentation.
  • Followed by second debate.

Indicative reading list:

Assignment for this session:

  • Prepare for the next session debate. Topic of the debate to be defined at the beginning of the course.

Session 7&8: European Union: the world’s leading aid donor
Description:

  • European development policy in the context of comprehensive EU external action. Coherence, linkages and synergies between development and other EU policies: foreign policy and security, humanitarian aid, migration, trade and environment and climate change. Striving for a common EU policy and the challenges of coordination with EU Member States’ own development policies.
  • The European Union’s role and involvement as the leading international development actor. The promotion of values - human rights, gender equality, democracy, rule of law, good governance, justice and solidarity - and regional integration models.
  • Practical insights on development policy formulation and analysis of EU-ACP relations, the historical and political perspectives and constructing the future partnership.
  • Followed by third debate.

Indicative reading list:

  • Council, EP and COM (2017) ‘New European consensus on development. our world, our dignity, our future’, Joint statement by the Council of the EU, European Parliament and European Commission. Brussels, 7 June 2017. Download: https://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/sites/devco/files/european-consensus-on-development-final-20170626_en.pdf
  • Bruegel (2017): Europe in a New World Order. In Bruegel Policy Contribution (2).
  • Carbone, M. (2011), ‘The European Union and China's rise in Africa: Competing visions, external coherence and trilateral cooperation’, Journal of Contemporary African Studies, 29(2): 203-221
  • Delputte, S., Williams, Y. (2017) ‘Equal partnership between unequal regions? Assessing deliberative parliamentary diplomacy in ACP-EU relations’, Third World Thematics.

Assignment for this session:

  • Prepare for the next session debate. Topic of the debate to be defined at the beginning of the course.

Session 9&10: Emerging donors: new players, new alternatives.
Description:

  • The rise of emerging donors: funding trends, political, sectoral and regional priorities. Partnerships for trade and economic opportunities and the pursuit for energy security and natural resources. The increased appeal of new development actors and their success in offering an alternative to the established Western donors. Consequences for aid, multilateral institutions, conditionality and development architecture. The case of the BRICS and its representation in the UN, IMF and the World Bank.
  • China arrival as a major development aid donor. Its development policy, combining trade and investments with loans, credits and debt write-offs - and its links to its strategic national priorities.  The “One Belt One Road Initiative”, China’s win-win approach and the silent revolution in international cooperation.
  • Case study: Recipient-country experience: North-South vs South-South cooperation.
  • Followed by fourth and final debate.

Indicative reading list:

Assignment for this session:

  • Prepare for the next session debate. Topic of the debate to be defined at the beginning of the course.

Session 11&12: Beyond aid: the future prospects of global development cooperation
Description:

  • The future of multilateralism, the challenge of reform and delivering on the Sustainable Development Goals. The declining importance of aid flows. Changes in the global balance of power and prospects of cooperation to respond to systemic issues such as climate change, demography, extremism, inequality and tax cooperation.
  • Choices that need to be made in steering development cooperation in the future: i) focus on fragile countries or across-the-board development; ii) aid focused on poor countries or aid focus on poor people.
  • End of course review and evaluation

SHORT BiographY

Isabel Pimenta is an economist, currently working at the European Commission in the Directorate General for International Cooperation and Development. She has experience in policy formulation and management of development interventions, with particular emphasis on regional economic integration, trade, private sector development, public finance management, domestic revenue mobilisation, tax avoidance and illicit financial flows. Isabel has worked on development cooperation for West Africa and Latin America and has spent time in India as an economic researcher on topics of food security and poverty reduction. Prior to joining the European Commission, she worked in the energy private sector. She has obtained degrees in European Economic Studies from College of Europe, International Relations from Technical University of Lisbon and Economics from University of Porto.