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OAFP 5310 - Ideas on the left : pasts and futures

Type d'enseignement : Elective

Semester : Autumn 2018-2019

Number of hours : 24

Language of tuition : English

Pre-requisite

This class will combine historical perspectives on the political theory and economy of the Left in Europe and the US with perspectives on contemporary debates that define Leftist thinking and the key issues ahead. The course will set actual experience of politics in theoretical light, and mix historical analysis with concrete innovative policy ideas for the future. Sessions are coupled two by two, held together by an overarching theme.

Course Description

This class will combine historical perspectives on the political theory and economy of the Left in Europe and the US with perspectives on contemporary debates that define Leftist thinking and the key issues ahead. The course will set actual experience of politics in theoretical light, and mix historical analysis with concrete innovative policy ideas for the future. Sessions are coupled two by two, held together by an overarching theme. During this course students will learn : • Essential elements from the history of progressivism during the last century, distinguish between currents of leftist thinking, understand the political theory and political economy of the Left and the core meaning of its key concepts • Develop their insights into contemporary debates • Learn and reflect on innovative new policy ideas and actively contribute through individual assignments to discussion on how these might contribute to a rejuvenation of progressive egalitarianism

Teachers

ANDERSSON, Jenny (Research director CNRS, CEE - Sciences Po)

Pedagogical format

Elective course 24hrs

Course validation

Students will be assessed on their midterm essay and on their . Mid term essays • Essays are due on week 11. No extension will be granted. Any additional delay will reduce the final grade obtained for the written text accordingly, independent of the content. • Essays should not be longer than 3000 words. Provide word count. • The bibliography for the essay can include, but should absolutely not be limited to, the sources referred to in the syllabus. One expects the use of a minimum of 7 academic sources beyond the sources provided in the course syllabus (eg: academic publisher, peer-reviewed journals). Please use the Harvard referencing system (see http://www.citethisforme.com/harvard-referencing). • Provide a PRINTED version, double sided, single spaced, no fancy cover but space for comments at either front or end of essay. Specify the word count. Font 12, justified and single spaced. Please staple. • Do not forget to write your name and to number pages. If you submit an electronic copy as well (and never in lieu of a paper copy), it must be a single document (not as two files).

Workload

• Students are expected to be physically and intellectually present at each lecture. • Participation is essential as all lectures and particularly EM sessions will rely on discussion and policy analysis. Students need to be prepared to contribute to every session through mandatory readings and readings to be precised before each session. Students will be asked to write a brief on a policy idea for one of the sessions 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12.

Required reading

  • Eley, G. (2002). Forging democracy: The history of the left in Europe, 1850-2000. Oxford University Press.
  • Mudge, S. (2018). Leftism reinvented. Leftist parties from socialism to neoliberalism. Harvard University Press.
  • Moschonas, G. (2002). In the name of social democracy. The Great transformation 1945 to the present. Verso.
  • Unger, R.M. (2005). What should the Left propose? Verso.