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OBGP 3175 - Managing action in complex international organization

Type d'enseignement : Lecture alone

Semester : Autumn 2018-2019

Number of hours : 24

Language of tuition : English

Voir les plans de cours et bibliographies

Pre-requisite

aucun

Course Description

What is the role of international organisations in global governance? How can they deliver in a context characterised by the erosion of citizen's trust in government's capacity to address pressing challenges? Critical Management Studies (CMS) have emerged in the last 20 years to question management practices in firms and bureaucracies. The course draws on CMS to reflect on what states do (policy), how they do it (modes of government) and how bureaucracies are managed. Particular attention is paid to the management of international organisations. The OECD is a case in point: it influence policy in member countries and beyond; it promotes good practices across a range of policy areas; it promotes innovation in public management. The course draws on academic literature and on professional experience to reflect upon modes of management that are fit for purpose in an international organisation.

Teachers

LEFLAIVE, Xavier (Administrateur, OCDE)

Pedagogical format

Sessions 1-5 are based on lectures informed by academic literature and professional experience. Sessions 7-11 are based on students' oral presentations, used to kick-start a discussion with the group. Active participation in each session is required and facilitated.

Course validation

Assessment and grades: Students will be asked to select one policy area or one international organisation. They will write one 3,000 words essay on the selected policy area or international organisation. The essay can be drafted in teams of maximum 3 students. Each team will be given one grade (same grade for each team member) for the essay. A list of policy areas is provided below. It is indicative only and can be adjusted to reflect suggestions from students. For the policy area they have selected, students are requested to i) discuss the global dimension of the policy area; ii) present how international organisations work in this policy area; iii) flag challenges and limitations; and iv) explore alternative ways of managing the policy area in a globalised environment. For instance: how climate change has emerged on the global policy agenda; the role of IGOs (typically UNFCCC) in managing climate change; the limitations faced by this architecture; options to overcome them. Alternatively, students can select one IO. A list of IOs is provided below. It is indicative only and can be adjusted to reflect suggestions from students. For the IO they have selected, students are requested to i) review how that IO drives (or is affected by) globalisation; ii) flag challenges and limitations; and iii) explore options to address them. For instance: how GAVI emerged and now drives the globalisation of vaccines; the pros and cons of such an arrangement; how vaccines could be managed globally. Indicative list of policy areas: urbanisation; climate change; health; education; sustainable development; water; corporate social responsibility; trade; fiscal affairs; drugs and organized crime; migration; corruption… Indicative list of IOs: G20; UN agencies (WTO, WHO, UNEP, Security Council…); the World Bank; GAVI; multinational enterprises; global NGOs or civil society organisations; philanthropies (Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; Rockefeller Foundation...). In addition, students will take a test in class during one session (tentatively session 8; to be confirmed). Students will have to answer 2 questions: one on the substance of sessions 3 to 6; one on the book they have selected at the beginning of the class (see Required Reading, under Session 1). Finally, active participation in class will be rewarded. To encourage active participation, each session will open with a short discussion on news items of relevance for the course; the news items will be selected and presented by students. Active participation also takes the form of questions, remarks or experience sharing during the sessions. Each student will receive 3 grades. Maximum score: 3,000 words essay on one selected policy area or IO 10 Test in class: 7 Participation in class : 3 TOTAL 20

Workload

Students have to select and read one book in social theory, which puts public management in perspective. Students have to prepare one oral presentation, in a group of 2-4. Preparation requires reading suggested material, and possibly other sources, including personal experience in a relevant area or organisation.

Required reading

  • Students are encouraged to situate public management in the context of recent transformations of contemporary societies:
  • Bauman Z. (2003), Society under Siege, Blackwell (traduction française: La société assiégée, Le Rouergue/Chambon)
  • Elliott A., B.S. Turner (2012), On Society, Polity
  • Giddens A. (ed., 2003), The Progressive Manifesto, Polity; in particular, A. Giddens, Neoprogressivism. A new agenda for social democracy; J. Kay, The embedded market; F. Schuppert, The Ensuring State
  • Sassen S. (2007), A Sociology of Globalization, W.W. Norton

Additional required reading

Sennett R. (2006), The Culture of the New Capitalism, Yale University

Plans de cours et bibliographies

Session 1: Rationale for the course. Main messages

Session 2: The OECD as an intergovernmental organisation

Sessions 3-6: Debunking myths in International Organisations

  • You can't manage what you can't measure (on measurement, indicators and monitoring)
  • TINA - There Is No Alternative (information, expert knowledge and policy making)
  • We know what should be done. The challenge is implementation (the limits of the rational policy maker)
  • It takes political will (the narrative of controlled change)
  • Session 7-11: Inter-governmental Organisations as organisations
  • International organisations at work (bureaucracies; New Public Management; what next?)
  • The narrative of international organisations
  • International organisations and the critique of globalisation
  • Session 8: Test in class (one hour; to be confirmed)

Session 12: Wrapping up

Non-standard course outline (including readings)

Session 1: Rationale for and relevance of the course

The session explains why organisation theory can inform a reflection about globalisation and the role international organisations (IOs). It introduces the concept of organisational narrative and illustrates some of the main stories that pervade the operation of IOs. The session sets the scene for the subsequent sessions. It clarifies all issues related to the organisation of the course, students’ participation and assessment.

Students are encouraged to situate globalisation, IOs and public management in the context of recent transformations of contemporary societies. How do these transformations affect (or are driven by) patterns of globalisation, the policy agenda, the ways states and bureaucracies operate?

The Required readings include some of the most prominent analysts of contemporary societies, whose work is relevant for the course, even though they never directly considered IOs. Students are requested to select one of the three books below and consider how it helps reflect on globalisation, international bureaucracies and public management.
Required readings - One of the books below:

  • Bauman Z. (2003), Society under Siege, Blackwell (traduction française: La société assiégée, Le Rouergue/Chambon)
  • Mouffe C. (2013), Agonistics: Thinking the World Politically, Verso Sassen S. (2014), Expulsions. Brutality and Complexity in the Global Economy, Harvard University Press (traduction française: Expulsions. Brutalité et complexité dans l'économie globale, Gallimard)

Session 2: The OECD as an intergovernmental organisation

The session will introduce the OECD, taken as an illustration of how IOs operate and deliver in a globalised world. The class will discuss distinctive features of the OECD as an IO. We will explore how fit the OECD is for future challenges.
Recommended readings:

  • Mahon R., S. McBride (2009), Standardizing and disseminating knowledge: the role of the OECD in global governance, European Political Science Review, 1, pp.83-101
  • Martens K., A.P. Jakobi (eds., 2010), Mechanisms of OECD Governance: International Incentives for National Policy Making?, Oxford University Press
  • Salzmann J. (2011), The OECD’s role in international law, George Washington International Law Review, vol.43, pp.255
  • Woodward R. (2004), Global Monitor: the OECD, New Political Economy, vol.9, 1

Sessions 3-6: Debunking myths in International Organisations

A series of 4 sessions develops a critical analysis of how IOs operate in a globalised environment. The sessions focus on some of the basic stories told by IOs, illustrated by the four statements below, which can be found in most reports and policy papers developed by IOs:

  • You can't manage what you can't measure (on measurement, indicators and monitoring)
  • TINA - There Is No Alternative (information, expert knowledge and policy making)
  • We know what should be done. The challenge is implementation (the limits of the rational policy maker)
  • It takes political will (the narrative of controlled change)

Critical organisation theory will be used to show that these statements are misleading. They portray policy making, the operation of governments and international relations in a most peculiar way, which does not reflect mundane experience. The critique of the basic statements above introduces alternative ways of seeing and practicing government and international relations.
Recommended readings:

  • On demand

Sessions 7-11: Intergovernmental Organisations as organisations

The literature on intergovernmental organisations tends to consider them as black boxes, uniform agents in a globalised context. Recent developments in political science and international relations open the box and explore how IOs operate as organisations.
The sessions will present the outputs of recent research in this area, with a focus on the distinctive (while still emerging) contribution of critical organisation theory. Some of the main themes will include:

  • International organisations at work: how specific IGOs are as bureaucracies; how IGOs are affected by New Public Management; what comes next?
  • The narrative of international organisations: what the stories are told by IGOs, on globalisation, control, the political
  • International organisations and the critique of globalisation. Neo-liberal globalisation has come under more severe critique in recent ears. How does that affect intergovernmental organisations?

Recommended reading:

  • Special issue of the Journal of International Organizations Studies (2014), Volume 5, Issue 1.

Session 12: Wrapping up

Session 12 draws the threads together and sketches scenarios for the future of international organisations. The discussion will provide concrete answers to such questions as:

  • How can international organisations deliver with high impact?
  • How can international organisations engage with central governments?
  • How to design and manage projects in international organisations?
  • Why and when join an international organisation (expectations, ambition)?

Biographical Information

Title: Principal administrator
Organisation/Affiliation: OECD Environment Directorate
Xavier Leflaive joined the OECD Environment Directorate in 2004. He currently leads the Water Team, promoting policies that contribute to water security and sustainable growth. Prior to joining the OECD, he has worked as a consultant, advising governments and corporates on sustainable development.
Xavier Leflaive studied public and private management and social and political sciences in France, Canada and the U.K. He holds a Ph.D. in political and social sciences from the University of Cambridge (UK). He explores how critical organisation theory can inspire new ways of managing corporates and bureaucracies.
Xavier Leflaive teaches critical organisation theory at Sciences Po / EMI and PSIA.