Accueil > Discrimination and Anti-Discrimination: literary, historical and legal approaches

IFCO 2515 - Discrimination and Anti-Discrimination: literary, historical and legal approaches

Type d'enseignement : Lecture alone

Semester : Spring 2020-2021

Number of hours : 24

Language of tuition : English

Pre-requisite

This is an introductory course with a decentralized perspective.

Course Description

The objective of this course is to familiarize students with contemporary debates surrounding the causes of, and remedies for, discrimination. The basic themes will be: exclusions based on race, class, gender and sexual orientation. Other topics such as religious and ethnic segregation may also be discussed but will not be developed in a particular session. This interdisciplinary course will start with an analysis of the effects of conquest, colonialism and neocolonialism on patterns of discrimination. It will then study race, class, gender and sexual orientation as causes for exclusion. In some cases, debates will be framed through literature and will be analyzed with academic texts. Each of the themes will also include a discussion about the legal tools proposed to remedy each pattern. The course will end with a reflection surrounding the limits and possibilities of law.

Teachers

  • ALVIAR, Helena (Professeure à l'Ecole de droit de Sciences Po)
  • KATSIGINIS, Alexia (Doctorante contractuelle)

Course validation

Individual essay: 25% // In-class exercises: 50% // Final take home exam: 25% // + 1 point bonus sur la moyenne finale pour la participation. // Starting week 2, a group of 8 students will write an individual reaction essay of the readings.  This reaction essay must be no longer than 2000 words.  It should include an introduction where the author discusses an idea or set of ideas of the readings that are controversial, interesting or related in some way to contemporary discussions to the geographical location of their choice.  It should also incorporate a body of a few paragraphs where the main idea is developed, as well as a conclusion. The text must be uploaded in moodle two days prior the course session.  Essay topics will be assigned the first day of class.This essay will represent 25% of the grade. Every session will have an in-class exercise to be discussed in groups of three or four students.  Groups will be assigned the first day of class. These exercises should be uploaded in moodle.In class exercises will represent 50% of the gradeThere will be a final exam to be developed at home and will represent 25% of the grade.

Workload

This course is designed in order to promote autonomous learning. This means that an important portion of each session will be dedicated to in class discussions and the collective thinking of issues. For this reason, previous reading is mandatory. Class participation is highly recommended. // The professor will hold office hours every Thursday afternoon between 3 pm and 6 pm in order to answer questions or help students think about their essays. Students must ask for a previous appointment by emailing the professor at least two days in advance.

Required reading

  • 1. Jill Lepore, These Truths: A History of the United States, Norton Press, 2018.
  • 2. Andre Gunder Frank, The Development of Underdevelopment in J. Timmons Roberts, Amy Bellone Hite and Nitsan Chorev (eds.), The Globalization and Development Reader: Perspectives on Development and Global Change, Blackwell, 2015, pgs. 105-114.
  • 3. Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Dependency and Development in Latin America, J. Timmons Roberts, Amy Bellone Hite and Nitsan Chorev (eds.), The Globalization and Development Reader: Perspectives on Development and Global Change, Blackwell, 2015, pgs. 115-125.
  • 4. Gabriel García Márquez, A Hundred Years of Solitude
  • 5. Sven Beckert, Empire of Cotton: A Global History, Vintage Press, 2014.